Monday, April 16, 2012

Narcissus Lace Tunisian Stitch



To make the Narcissus Lace Tunisian Stitch, you’ll need to get your long afghan hook and make a foundation chain with a multiple of 4 stitches.

Step 1:  Insert hook in 2nd chain from hook; yarn over, draw up a loop


{Repeat Step 1 across row, keeping all loops on your hook.}
Step 2:  Yarn over, draw through 2 loops on your hook; *chain 4, draw through 5 loops on your hook



{Repeat Step 2 from * across row until you have 3 loops remaining on your hook. Chain 3, draw through 3 loops.}
Step 3:  Chain 1, insert hook in next 3 chain stitches and in each chain stitch in each loop of chain 4. Keep all loops on hook across row.


{Repeat Steps 2 and 3 for pattern.}

©2012 All Rights Reserved 

36 comments:

  1. I love the name of this. Makes me think of the character in Harry Potter (who I can not imagine crocheting!) : )

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    1. So glad you stopped by again, Joy. No, I couldn't imagine Harry Potter crocheting either, but he might enjoy it if someone else crocheted something for him:)

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  2. Your creativity astounds me, not only do you make all this, you then have the patience to photo and blog about it. Where do you find the energy, or is it a Love?

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    1. Well Coach Teresa, if you can't share what you truly enjoy with people who will enjoy it just as much as you do, then you may as well live in a cave. It's what builds community, heals brokenness and revives the soul. And I have to admit, crochet is one of the best stress relievers I've ever found...definitely worth sharing...a must if you ask me.

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  3. Interesting. I haven't crocheted in ages, but I could feel my fingers itch while reading this.

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    1. Stop the itching! Time to pick up your crochet hook and have some fun, Medeia:) So glad you stopped by for a visit:)

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  4. As pretty as the stitch itself is, the color of yarn really highlights the beauty.

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    1. I suppose stitches and yarns go together, as does creative inspiration, which is one of the reasons crochet is one of my favorite hobbies:) Thanks for stopping by Wendy:)

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  5. Love this thanks for sharing. I love working with he long hook!

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    1. Afghan hooks are a lot of fun, as are cro-hooks...see my reply to Glory below. I'm so glad you're enjoying what I'm sharing on this blog:) Hope to chat with you again soon, Emma:)

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  6. Oh, I love that stitch! I gotta get me an afghan hook. Which sizes do you recommend to start? I have none so far and wish to get a few of the more used sizes.

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    1. Personally, I think it's best to use larger sized hooks to start. It's easier to keep the loops loose enough when you're getting the feel of working the stitches across the hook and removing them. However, don't let that prevent you from using smaller hooks. I have several sizes and they all work well. Also, if you find a cro-hook (an afghan crochet hook with hooks on both ends), you can use it just like a regular afghan hook. Remember that post I wrote for letter M...the yellow bib was made with crohooking...another post I'll be sharing in the future. Yes, I will show everyone how to cro-hook on this blog too:)

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  7. What a pretty stitch!I found you on Blogging A to Z!

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    1. Very cool! Thanks for visiting my blog:)

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  8. would love to know what yarn this is...it's really pretty. if you can, send answer to anne@spider-electronics.com

    Thanks, Carol Stefanic

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    1. 4-ply cotton yarn...one of my favorites

      Thanks for stopping by and visiting my blog:)

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  9. Found this on Pinterest and I'm gonna try it. Never used one of these hook before but I'm sure I can do it. Thanks for posting it.

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    1. Oh it's very easy, and I'll be posting many more patterns using the afghan hook as I add to my blog. Thanks for stopping by and visiting. Hope to see you again real soon:)

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  10. Hi, Just happened to find your blog and definitely going to try this! I inherited a whole bunch of knitting needles, crochet hooks and found what I think is the cro-hook. The pattern above reminds me very much of a baby cover that my mom made for my daughter (some 38 years ago!) and I can only guess that she was using her cro-hook. Love your blog and you can count on my being your newest 'fan'. TFS

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    1. Yea! Welcome Crafty Grandma :) Wouldn't it be neat to recreate a pattern your mom made 38 years ago? So happy you have a new stash of needles, hooks and supplies to enjoy!

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  12. Only a suggestion: for anyone who isn't sure about getting into Tunisian Crochet, use your regular crochet hook and play with TC stitches.

    All you have to do is put a rubberband or a pencil eraser on the end of your hook so the stitches don't fall off. (Remembering that in Crochet you usually only have 1 st on the needle - but with TC the entire needle shaft can be full of stitches)

    I'm glad to have found this site, MJJ. True Community is difficult but worth it when achieved.

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    1. Neat suggestion, Marny. Yes, I agree, true community is vitally important. Best of Wednesday to you:)

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  13. you still around? how many chains do you start with - I'm having trouble? :/

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    1. Hi Sandy,
      A multiple of 4 stitches, depending on how long you want to make your project. (see top instruction before steps). Then follow steps in order. Thanks for stopping by.

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  14. just found your site been looking for help with this is it close the the tunisian crochet cluster stitch it looks like it . going to try it the way you have it to see if it works better thanks for this

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  15. Thank you so much for the step-by-step. It is so easy to follow, especially for beginners like me. I started learning how to crochet in February this year and I love it. This tutorial was so easy, I got it on the first try. I'm using a double-ended crochet hook my husband made me out of a knitting needle and it works great. Thank you again and I love your blog.

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  16. I have Rheumatoid Arthritis and crocheting is one craft that goes easy on the joints. I have a blog also that touches on crocheting, cooking, my artwork and photography and living with RA. I just began Tunisian crochet and love it, can't wait to try this stitch. Enjoyed your blog and hope you check mine out. Thanks so much. heartofdixiebbyjohnel.blogspot.com Enjoy

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  17. For some reason its not working when I do 28 stitches. I get 2 loops at the end instead of 3. Do you have any idea why this is happening?

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    1. I'm having the same problem when I try with 28 stitches, I can't figure out where I'm going wrong!

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  18. GRACIAS, no conocia de estas cosas, pero estoy muy facinada con las cosas tan lindas que se hacen solo con materiales tan sencillos

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  19. Es un punto precioso, la pena es que soy principiante y no entiendo inglés. De todas formas voy a ver si lo consigo. Muchas gracias.

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  20. Regarding this:

    Step 3: Chain 1, insert hook in next 3 chain stitches and in each chain stitch in each loop of chain 4. Keep all loops on hook across row.

    Is there supposed to be some y/o and drawing up of loops here? I don't get this part. Just insert the hook?

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    1. You draw up a loop through every stitch, ending up with the same amount of loops as you started with. HTH.

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